R.C. Chapman’s S.O.S. 1:17

By R.C. Chapman

“The beams of our house are cedar, and our rafters of fir.”—Song of Solomon 1:17

 

The everlasting covenant standeth fast with Jesus my Lord.  With Him, and with me in Him, is it made.  A sure house, according to the promise, is built for us.  My Lord is the Son of God, by the word of His power upholding all things which by Him at the first were made.

Of Him, the mighty God, the Word made flesh, was it said, “Behold my Servant, whom I uphold; mine Elect, in whom my soul delighteth: He shall not fail, nor be discouraged, until He have set judgment in the earth.” —Isaiah 42:1,4 –He could say, “I live by the Father”—John 6:57; and again, “The Father is greater than I”—John 14:28; because the brethren partook of flesh and blood, He likewise partook of the same.

O my soul! Thou dost join with the angels to worship the Son of God; but far above angels’ worship is thy song of triumph and faith!  Thy Lord and God calleth thee brother and kinsman, and is not ashamed! And this thy faith credits, delighting itself in a sea of eternal love and manifold grace! Art thou upheld? So is thy Brother that was born for thy adversity.

His throne and crown are made sure to Him by the oath and promise of God: “The Lord sware, and will not repent, Thou art a priest forever, after the order of Melchizedek”—Hebrews 7:21; “Once have I sworn by My holiness; I will not lie unto David”—Psalm 89:35-36.  A sure house is built for Him, and also for me: as the Lord is loved, so am I. “Thou hast loved them as Thou hast loved me.” —John 17:23– And this, my Lord, Thou speakest, that I and all saints might have Thy joy fulfilled in us.  In this Thy own heart is glad.

And now Thou wouldest stir up my soul to remembrance of the sure dwelling place wherein Thou and I, with all Thy brethren, rest.  Thy glorious power and majesty are verily our beams of cedar and our rafters of fir.  I know it, O my Lord, my heart hath seen an end of all perfection.  All things under the sun are vanity and corruption; but I look above, and see Thee gloriously exalted; having a throne and kingdom, by the gift of the Father, which can never be moved.

Daily Thou dost say to Thine, “Peace be to ye;” and as my faith harkens to Thy voice, I worship within the vail by the blood of sprinkling.  Now wonders come to view shining forth from Thy perfection of beauty.  I know that my inheritance is incorruptible, undefiled, and such as cannot fade away—laid up in heaven for me; and, Lord, Thou, who knowest all things, —John 16:30–knowest that where my treasure is, there my heart is also.—Matthew 6:21; Luke 12:34

Lord, show me daily the glorious foundations of Thy throne; and as my faith shall gain strength, so shall hope thrive, love wax fervent, and shall triumph over the powers of darkness, and this present evil world; so shall I behave myself according to my high calling—a stranger and a sojourner, whose shifting tent is here, whose sure dwelling is above!

 

 

 

Advertisements

Life of Faith 11: The Justified Highly Value the Justifier

By Richard Sibbes

Now let us see how it may be known that I live the life of faith in justification.

By trying how it comes in the soul: as Romans 7:4, says the apostle, Therefore, my brothers, you also were made dead to the law through the body of Christ, that you would be joined to another, to him who was raised from the dead, that we might produce fruit to God.”  After a man is dead by the law, and apprehends himself slain, then he comes to live this life of faith.  Christ enlivens none but the dead…Such only are quickened by him who find themselves dead in the law.  Then they come to see that life and comfort are out of themselves and in another.  Justification springs from a holy despair, and receiving life, after we have seen ourselves dead.

Where this life of faith is, there is a wonderful high valuing and prizing of Christ, his righteousness, merits, obedience, and wisdom of God in that way of forgiveness of our sins by this God-man, the wonderful mediator; as in Philippians 3:8, Paul counts all things “but loss and dung for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus our Lord,” being contented to suffer the loss of all things to win Christ.  It is the precious pearl to sell all for.  Paul accounts all our own righteousness as nothing in regard to this.

There must be a high estimation of the riches of Christ’s obedience and sufferings: for where there is not this high estimation of it, they are rotten in the point of justification.  But you see how Paul sets at being bad and vilifies all things in regard thereof; so Roman 4:16, “Abraham is brought in to be justified by grace, to the end that the promise might be sure to all the seed. ” And Psalm 32:2, He is pronounced to be the blessed man, “unto whom the Lord imputes not iniquity, and whose sin is covered.”

 

 

 


This common domain work’s language modernized in some places.

Christian Love 20: Right View of Self Leads to Graciousness with Others

By Hugh Binning

If a Christian will take an impartial view of himself, he cannot but this way reason himself to a meek, composed, and affectionate temper towards other brethren.  What is it in another that offends me, when I search within, I will not also find the same, or worse, or as evil in myself? Is there a mote in my brother’s eye? Perhaps there may be a beam in my own; and why then should I look to the mote that is in my brother’s eye? ←Matthew 7:3.  When I look inwardly, I find a desperately wicked heart, which lodges all that iniquity I saw in others.  And if I am not so sensible of it, it is because it is also deceitful above all things, and would flatter me in my own eyes,←Jeremiah 17:9.

If my brother offends me in some things, how these things are caused to vanish out of sight in the view of my own guiltiness before God, and the abominations of my own heart, known to his holiness and my conscience? Surely I cannot see so much evil in my brother as I find in my own heart; and whenever I withdraw back within this, I find the sea of corruption so great, that I wonder not at the streams which break forth in others.  But all my wonder is that God has set bounds to it in me or in any.

Whenever I find my spirit rising against the infirmities of others, and my mind swelling over them, I restrain myself with this thought, “I myself also am a man,” as Peter said to Cornelius when he would have worshipped him.  As he restrained another’s idolizing of him, I may cure my own self-idolizing heart.  Is it anything strange that weak men fail, and sinful men fall? Is not all flesh grass, and all the perfection and goodliness of it as the flower of the field? ←Isaiah 40:6. —Is not every man at his best state altogether vanity? ←Psalm:39:5. Is not man’s breath in his nostrils?←Isaiah 2:22. —And am I not myself a man?  Therefore I will not be high minded but fear, ←Romans 11:20. — I will not be moved to indignation but provoked to compassion, knowing that I myself am compassed with infirmities, ← Hebrews 5:2.

 

 

 

 


The language of this common domain work modernized in places by this site.

Christian Love 19: Forgiving and Being Forgiven

By Hugh Binning

If God has forgiven me so many grievous offences, if he has pardoned so heinous and innumerable injuries, that amount to a kind of infiniteness in number and quality, O how much more am I bound to forgive my brethren a few light and trivial offences? Col. 3:13—”Forbearing one another, if any man has a quarrel against any, so also you do.” Eph. 4:32—”And be kind to one another, tender hearted, forgiving one another, even a God for Christ’s sake has forgiven you.” With what face can I pray, “Lord, forgive me my sins,” when I may meet with such a retort, you cannot forgive your brethren’s sins, infinitely less both in number and degree?  Matt. 6:15—”But if your do not forgive men their trespasses, neither will your heavenly Father forgive your trespasses.”  What unparalleled ingratitude were it, what monstrous wickedness, that after he has forgiven all our debt, because we desired him yet we should have no compassion on our fellow servants even as he had pity on us!

O! what a dreadful sound will that be in the ears of many Christians, “O you wicked servant, I forgave you all your debt, because you desired me! Shouldn’t you also have had compassion on your servants, even as I has pity on you?  And his lord was angry, and delivered him to the tormentors, till he should pay all that was due to him.  So likewise shall my heavenly Father do also to you, if you from your hearts do not forgive every one his brother their trespasses,” —Matt.18:32-35. 

When we cannot dispense with one penny, how should he dispense with his talents?  And when we cannot pardon ten, how should he forgive ten thousand? When he has forgiven my brother all his iniquity, may not I pardon one?  Should I impute that which God will not impute, or discover that which God has covered? How should I expect he should be merciful to me, when I cannot show mercy to my brother?  Ps. 18:25—”With the merciful you will show yourself merciful.”  Should I, for one or few offences, hate, bite, and devour him for whom Christ died, and loved not his life to save him? —Rom.14:15 and 1st Cor. 8:11.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This common domain work’s language modernized in places by this site.

 

 

 

 

R.C. Chapman’s S.O.S. 1:15

By R.C. Chapman

“Behold, thou art fair; my love; behold, thou art fair: thou hast doves’ eyes.” –Song of Solomon 1:15

What though the law in my members be vile and corrupt? Thou, Lord dost teach me to hate the evil I do, and love the good I do not. Thou dost sprinkle me with Thy blood, and purge my conscience from dead works; and I can say before Thee, who knowest all things, it is no more I, but sin that dwelleth in me.  Sweet is my liberty, and holy and good, notwithstanding the flesh within me.

Mine outcry, “O wretched man that I am, who shall deliver?” –Romans 7:24, be tokens my freedom—slaves bend the knee and flatter; freemen fill their land with complaints upon a bare word of tyranny and while oppression is yet far off.  Lord, I comfort myself with double comfort.  I say within me, Consider, my soul, how that in thy weakness thy Lord’s glory in manifest, His strength made perfect! In this I rejoice! Yea, and will rejoice.

Moreover, my soul, know thou the day makes haste to come when that which is in part shall be done away; this body of death is not forever; but the workmanship of the Spirit of Christ shall endure forever; for “The Lord shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and the days of the mourning shall be ended.”—Isaiah 60:12

O my soul! In the first man, Adam, thou wast, with him, earthly, sensual, and devilish—in the Second Man, the Lord from heaven, thou art quickened and justified, and body and spirit shall be made like Him, free of infirmity and all pollution; thy conscience shall ever be pure—thine affections only love—thy body, once a house of clay, shall be fashioned like unto the glorious body of Thy Lord, and all thy members, once instruments of unrighteousness, shall forever be the instruments of love; Thy whole understanding, wondrously enlarged, shall know the riches of Christ, thy Lord, to be unsearchable!

O my Lord! While yet at home in the body I long after the deep humbleness of mind which shall beautify and be the holiness of thy glorified Church! Thou canst look on me as if I were already glorified with Thee. Thy love moves Thee to say, “Behold, thou art fair, my love; behold, thou art fair: Thou hast doves’ eyes.”—Song of Solomon 1:15

 

R.C. Chapman’s S.O.S. 1:14

By R.C. Chapman

“My Beloved is unto me as a cluster of camphire in the vineyards of Engedi.” Song of Solomon 1:14

In this wilderness, O my Lord! Thou hast planted Thy vineyard—the Church, for Thy name, and Thou hast fenced it and enclosed it; Thy glory is round about us. We have walls of salvation which all our enemies cannot overthrow.  O glorious security! Shining forth in the midst of the adversary’s fury and mischief and cunning!

What thanks worthy of the benefit canst thou render, O my soul! Because of thy safety, in the midst of manifold dangers, within the fence of thy Lord’s grace and power. Those above—dismissed from battle—do they boast any other keeper than Jesus, who is thy boast? If left by Him, they would unassaulted fall, and sink into destruction: now they stand in the Son of God, the Shepherd of Israel; and thou, my soul, dost stand in Him, and by Him prevail over thine enemies!

He not only maketh thee safe, but showeth thee aslo thy safety. Thank Him for faith—thank Him again for assurance of heart before Him! He has separated thee unto Himself, and would have thee dwell alone while in the midst of His enemies.  Seek, then, no rest nor abiding city here, but retreat the bosom of Jesus; there lodge and rest.  Lord! I know it is Thy will and joy that so I should do; and since Thou hast given my Thy Spirit, and taught me to walk I the Spirit, my soul counts all things but Thyself as the small dust of the balance.

Man walketh in a vain shadow, and disquieteth himself in vain: I marvel at the grave folly of the wise, and the childish strife of the great ones of the earth. My heart pities them, prays for them; for I know they are but as hewers of wood and drawers of water to the congregation of the Lord.  They sink into brutes, while they would be as gods.  O Lord, I leave them their portion in this world, and find rest and peace in Thee! O teach me to sit at Thy feet, and keep me there! Let me dread the proud look, and every high thought; ever let Thy mind be in me.

Thou didst humble Thyself out of love; and in Thy grace, being rich in Thy Godhead, Thou becamest poor. And shall not I sink with Thee? Lord, open to me Thine humiliation and poverty; Thy low estate, when Thou was a “worm and no man” –Psalm 22:6, and let me be fashioned after Thine image, as I behold Thy stoop of love; so shall my heart be contrite, my spirit meek and lowly, and Thou shalt be unto me daily a cluster of camphire, that revives the spirit of the humble and the heart of the contrite!

Life of Faith 8: He Justifies Us Daily

By Richard Sibbes

As we sin daily, so Zech.13.1, “There is a fountain daily running, to wash away sin and uncleanness.” Therefore for our daily sinning, we must continually run and bathe our souls in this blood, apply the comforts of his sufferings, intercession, and obedience unto us.  St. John teaches us this much; He says, “If any man sin, we have as advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous, and he is the propitiation for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world,”  1st John 2.1.  If we sin daily, he justifies the sinner daily:  He came to save sinners: therefore, when sin stirs us up to run from God, we should run to him.  Faith says, “There is no condemnation to them that are in Christ Jesus,” Romans 8.1.  Why?

My sin was condemned in Christ, and a condemned person has no voice.  Christ came to destroy sin, and condemned sin in the flesh.  Our sins were crucified with him, and are now all condemned sins, if we will go to Christ, who has borne all our iniquities, as the prophet Isaiah excellently shows.  Therefore St. Paul triumphantly demands the question, “Who will lay anything to the charge of God’s elect?  It is God who justifies, who is he that condemns?  “It is Christ who died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also makes intercession for us.  Who shall then separate us from the love of Christ?  Romans 8.38,31. 

So in our daily sins you see we have use of these things, to have, upon our confession, a daily pardon of course taken out everyday.  Thus God would not have us sink.  So long as there is matter of guilt in us, God will have a way to cleanse our souls, and renew our comforts.  Everyday we run into new debts, and everyday in the Lord’s prayer we are taught to ask pardon, and to run to God, to have the book crossed out with his blood.

Every day a Christian must eye the brazen serpent, I mean the Lord Jesus, signified thereby; he must sprinkle his heart with the blood if Christ, that the destroying angel may pass him in the day of wrath, as the Israelites then did.

This is it to live by faith; every day to sue out our pardon; to look to our advocate and surety, who has paid our debts, and cancelled that obligation against us, contrary to us, as the apostle speaks, daily to wash in that ever-running fountain. “Christ is a priest forever, after the order of Melchisedec,” Ps.  110.4.  Though the act be past, he remains the same still.  What puts down our courage, strikes us with terror and fear, but our sins?  Oh but why is this brazen serpent lifted, but to wash away our daily frailties and failings,so as whosoever believes in him should not perish, but have everlasting life? John 3.14-15. 

Christian Love 17: If God so Loved Us

By Hugh Binning

I may briefly reduce the chief persuading motive to this so needed an so yearned for grace into three or four heads.  All things within and without persuade to it, but especially the right consideration of the love of God in Christ, the wise and the impartial reflection on ourselves, the consideration of our brethren whom we are commanded to love, and the thorough inspection into the nature and use of the grace itself.

In consideration of the first, as soul might argue itself into a complacency with it and thus persuade itself, “He who doesn’t love, doesn’t know God, for God is love,” 1st John 4:8.  And since he who has known and believed the love that God has for us, must certainly dwell in love, since these two have such a strait unbreakable connection, then, as I would not declare to all my atheism and my ignorance of God, I will study to love my brethren.  And that I may love them, I will give myself to the search of God’s love, which is the place, locus inventionis, then I may find out the strongest and most effective way to persuade my mind, and to compel my heart to Christian affection.

First then, when I consider that so glorious and great a Majesty, so high and holy an One, self sufficient and all sufficient, who needs not go abroad to seek delight, because all happiness and delight is enclosed within his own bosom, can yet love a creature, yes and even be reconciled to so sinful a creature, which he might crush as easily as speak a word, that he can place his delight on so unworthy and base an object, O! how much more should I a poor and very bad creature, love my fellow creature, often times better than myself, and for the most part, not much worse?

There is an infinite distance and disproportion between God and man, yet he came over all to love man.  What difficulty should I have then to place my affection on my equal at worst, and often better?  There cannot be any proportional distance between the highest and lowest, between the richest and poorest, between the most wise and the most ignorant, between the most gracious and the most ungodly, as there is between the infinite God and a finite angel.  Should the mutual infirmities and failings of Christians, be an insuperable and impassable gulf, as between heaven and hell, that none can pass over by a bridge of love to either? “If God so loved us,” should not we love one another?  1st John 4:11.  And besides, when I consider that God has not loved me only, but my brethren who were worthy of hatred, with an everlasting love, and passed over all that was in them, and has spread his robe over their nakedness, and made it a time of love, which was a time of hating, how can I withhold my affection where God has bestowed his?  Are they not infinitely more unworthy of his than mine?  That my love come together with God’s on the same persons, is it not enough?

 


This common domain work modernized in few places by this site.